The Marginalian
The Marginalian

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How We Co-Create and Recreate the World: Octavio Paz on Sor Juana, Poetry as Rebellion, and the Creative Collaboration Between Writers and Readers
How We Co-Create and Recreate the World: Octavio Paz on Sor Juana, Poetry as Rebellion, and the Creative Collaboration Between Writers and Readers

“A work responds to the reader’s, not the author’s, questions.”

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E.B. White on How to Write for Children and the Writer’s Responsibility to All Readers
E.B. White on How to Write for Children and the Writer’s Responsibility to All Readers

“Anyone who writes down to children is simply wasting his time. You have to write up, not down.”

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The Source of Self-Regard: Toni Morrison on Wisdom in the Age of Information
The Source of Self-Regard: Toni Morrison on Wisdom in the Age of Information

“We move from data to information to knowledge to wisdom. And separating one from the other… knowing the limitations and the danger of exercising one without the others, while respecting each category of intelligence, is generally what serious education is about.”

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The Timeless Magic of the Book in the Age of Technology: Hermann Hesse on Why We Read and Always Will
The Timeless Magic of the Book in the Age of Technology: Hermann Hesse on Why We Read and Always Will

“If anyone wants to try to enclose in a small space, in a single house or a single room, the history of the human spirit and to make it his own, he can only do this in the form of a collection of books.”

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How to Listen Between the Lines: Anna Deavere Smith on the Art of Listening in a Culture of Speaking
How to Listen Between the Lines: Anna Deavere Smith on the Art of Listening in a Culture of Speaking

“Some people use language as a mask. And some want to create designed language that appears to reveal them but does not.”

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Hermann Hesse on the Three Types of Readers and the Most Transcendent Form of Reading
Hermann Hesse on the Three Types of Readers and the Most Transcendent Form of Reading

“At the hour when our imagination and our ability to associate are at their height, we really no longer read what is printed on the paper but swim in a stream of impulses and inspirations that reach us from what we are reading.”

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Trailblazing 19th-Century Astronomer Maria Mitchell on Social Change and the Life of the Mind
Trailblazing 19th-Century Astronomer Maria Mitchell on Social Change and the Life of the Mind

“Reformers are apt to forget… that the world is not made up entirely of the wicked and the hungry, there are persons hungry for the food of the mind, the wants of which are as imperious as those of the body.”

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Ursula K. Le Guin on Anger
Ursula K. Le Guin on Anger

“Anger continued on past its usefulness becomes unjust, then dangerous… It fuels not positive activism but regression, obsession, vengeance, self-righteousness. Corrosive, it feeds off itself, destroying its host in the process.”

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The Subterranean River of Emotion: Cheryl Strayed on Writing, the Art of Living with Opposing Truths, and the Three Ancient Motifs in All Great Storytelling
The Subterranean River of Emotion: Cheryl Strayed on Writing, the Art of Living with Opposing Truths, and the Three Ancient Motifs in All Great Storytelling

“When you’re speaking in the truest, most intimate voice about your life, you are speaking with the universal voice.”

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A Book Is a Heart That Only Beats in the Chest of Another: Rebecca Solnit on the Solitary Intimacy of Reading and Writing
A Book Is a Heart That Only Beats in the Chest of Another: Rebecca Solnit on the Solitary Intimacy of Reading and Writing

“The object we call a book is not the real book, but its potential, like a musical score or seed.”

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